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Monday, 18 June 2018 00:00

If you hear the term “fallen arches” or “pronation of the feet”, it typically refers to a condition called flat feet. Most babies are born with flat feet, and proper arches generally develop as the child approaches adulthood.  If this condition is still evident as your child ages, you may notice specific symptoms including pain in the foot while they stand for long periods of time, or they may walk on the outer edges of their feet. Occasionally, this ailment can be caused by certain maladies such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, or an injury to the foot. Additionally wearing improper footwear can be a reason for flat feet to develop, and genetic traits may be responsible for the formation of this condition. A proper diagnosis is typically performed by conducting a thorough examination of the feet, and this may include an analysis of the gait. Please consult with a podiatrist for additional information if you or your child is afflicted by flat feet.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Bert Altmanshofer from Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms:

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment:

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Duncansville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 11 June 2018 00:00

Pronation is defined as “the inward movement of the foot as it rolls to optimally distribute the force of impact on the ground as you run.” (Runner’s World). Pronation is essential in the shock absorption process, because it helps you push off the ball of your foot at the end of your gait cycle. When overpronation occurs, the shock absorption process isn’t performed correctly. Overpronation causes the muscles and tendons in the foot to undergo an excess amount of stress; this may lead to injuries such as plantar fasciitis, achilles tendonitis, and bunions. Nevertheless, underpronation can also occur while running. Underpronation may result in your running shoes wearing out quicker than usual. This problem tends to occur in those who have high arches in their feet or tight achilles tendons.

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Bert Altmanshofer of Pennsylvania. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training Into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Duncansville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 04 June 2018 00:00

Recent research has shown that an elevated body mass index, also known as BMI may play a significant role in affecting the structure of the foot. The heel may often endure extra pressure from the additional weight, and may result in a condition referred to as plantar fasciitis. The ability to exercise may be diminished by the weight, and podiatrists may suggest non aerobic exercises to strengthen the feet. The ankles may lose mobility and may affect the way walking is done. Wearing socks that have adequate cushioning may aid in providing necessary stability in addition to possibly avoiding injuries to the skin and soft tissues. A podiatrist will offer valuable information on how obesity affects the feet in addition to managing foot conditions that may have developed as a result of being obese.

The more you weigh, the harder your feet must work to support your body. If you’re an obese individual and are concerned about your feet, contact Dr. Bert Altmanshofer from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Obesity and your Feet

People who are overweight are putting more pressure on their ankles, knees, and hips as well as their feet. This unfortunately can lead to variety of different issues.

Problems & Complications Stemming from Obesity

  • When the body is overweight, it tries to compensate by changing the way that it moves. An obese person may lean forward and put extra weight on the wrong part of the foot. This puts unnecessary stress on the feet.
  • Obese people are also more likely to develop type II diabetes which is a condition that causes a lot of foot problems. People with diabetes often don’t feel the cuts and sores that they may have on their feet, which can lead to more complicated and severe issues.
  • Plantar fasciitis is another foot condition that can be caused by obesity. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, which causes pain and stiffness while walking and climbing stairs.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Duncansville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 29 May 2018 00:00

Kansas City Royals’ infielder Hunter Dozier recently had to place first baseman Lucas Duda on the 10-day disabled list due to plantar fasciitis. Duda has hit .366 in 12 games for the Royals in May, and has played through the injury since spring training. In order to treat the condition, he had been taking cortisone shots which allowed him to play throughout the regular season. Royals’ manager Ned Yost said Duda felt a “pop in his foot” in a recent game against the Indians in Cleveland. The recovery period for his injury is expected to be approximately 10 days.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Bert Altmanshofer from Pennsylvania. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affects people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Duncansville, PA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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